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  • When Will I Start Developing? for Teens


    Lots of girls and guys worry about when their bodies will develop. The fact is that physical development starts at different times and moves along at different rates in normal kids.

  • Delayed Puberty for Parents


    Puberty usually begins in girls 8-14, and in boys 9-15. If kids pass this normal age range without showing any signs of body changes, it's called delayed puberty.

  • Pregnancy & Baby for Parents


    Take care of yourself and your growing family by getting the advice that all new parents and parents-to-be need. Read about babyproofing your home, staying healthy during pregnancy, coping with colic, what to expect when your little one arrives, and much more.

  • Delayed Puberty for Teens


    Concerned about your growth or development? Puberty can be delayed for several reasons. Luckily, doctors usually can help teens with delayed puberty to develop more normally.

  • Everything You Wanted to Know About Puberty for Teens


    Voice cracking? Clothes don't fit? Puberty can be a confusing time, but learning about it doesn't have to be. Read all about it.

  • All About Puberty for Kids


    Voice cracking? Clothes don't fit? Puberty can be a confusing time, but learning about it doesn't have to be. Read all about it in this article for kids.

  • Precocious Puberty for Parents


    Precocious puberty - when signs of puberty start before age 7 or 8 in girls and age 9 for boys - can be tough for kids. But it can be treated.

  • Delayed Speech or Language Development for Parents


    Knowing what's "normal" and what's not in speech and language development can help you figure out if you should be concerned or if your child is right on schedule.

  • Growth and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old for Parents


    Kids entering puberty will undergo many changes in their developing bodies. Find out more about what to expect.

  • Growth and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old for Parents


    As kids grow from grade-schoolers to preteens, there continues to be a wide range of "normal" as far as height, weight, and shape.