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  • Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions for Parents


    Flatfeet, toe walking, pigeon toes, bowlegs, and knock-knees. Lots of kids have these common orthopedic conditions, but are they medical problems that can and should be corrected?

  • Clubfoot for Parents


    Clubfoot is a birth defect that makes one or both of a baby's feet point down and turn in. Most clubfeet can be successfully corrected using the nonsurgical Ponseti method.

  • How Long Does it Take for a Broken Bone to Heal? for Parents


    How long does a broken bone take to heal? Find out!

  • Bow Legs (Genu Varum) for Parents


    Bow legs is when the legs curve outward at the knees while the feet and ankles touch. Infants and toddlers often have bow legs. It's rarely serious and usually goes away on its own.

  • Ganglion Cysts for Parents


    Ganglion cysts are lumps that, most commonly, appear on the back of the wrist. These cysts are not cancerous and are easily treated.

  • Growth Plate Fractures for Parents


    Injuries to growth plates, which produce new bone tissue and determine the final length and shape of bones in adulthood, must be treated so that bones heal properly.

  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta (Brittle Bone Disease) for Parents


    Osteogenesis imperfecta (or brittle bone disease) prevents the body from building strong bones. People with OI have bones that might break easily.

  • Sever's Disease for Teens


    Sever's disease, a common heel injury, is due to inflammation (swelling) of the growth plate in the heel. While painful, it's only temporary and has no long-term effects.

  • Sever's Disease for Parents


    Sever's disease, a common heel injury in kids, is due to inflammation (swelling) of the growth plate in the heel. While painful, it's only temporary and has no long-term effects.

  • Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) for Teens


    A good, stable connection at your hip joint is what lets you walk, run, make that jump shot, and shake it on the dance floor. But in some teens – particularly those who are obese – the hip joint is weakened by slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE).