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Naps


Why Are Naps Important?

Sleep is a big part of a child's good health. For young kids to get enough of it, most need some daytime sleep. Naps:

  • Provide much-needed downtime that aids the important physical and mental development that happens in early childhood.
  • Help keep kids from becoming overtired, which can affect their moods and make it harder for them to fall asleep at night.
  • Give parents a break during the day and time to tackle household chores or just unwind.

Sleep Needs by Age

There's no one rule about how much daytime sleep kids need. It depends on their age, the child, and the sleep total during a 24-hour period. For example, one toddler may sleep 13 hours at night with only some daytime catnapping, while another gets 9 hours at night but takes a solid 2-hour nap each afternoon.

Still, these age-by-age guidelines give an idea of average daily sleep needs:

Birth to 6 months: Infants need about 14–18 total hours of sleep per day. Younger infants tend to sleep on and off around the clock, waking every 1–3 hours to eat. As they near 4 months of age, sleep rhythms become more set. Most babies sleep 9–12 hours at night, usually with an interruption for feeding, and have 2–3 daytime naps lasting about 30 minutes to 2 hours each.

6 to 12 months: Babies this age usually sleep about 14 hours total for the day. This usually includes two naps a day, which may last 20 minutes for some babies, for others a few hours. At this age, infants may not need to wake at night to feed, but may begin to have separation anxiety, which can add to sleep disturbances.

Toddlers (1 to 3 years): Toddlers need 12–14 hours of sleep, including an afternoon nap of 1–3 hours. Young toddlers might still be taking two naps, but naps should not be too close to bedtime, as they may make it harder for toddlers to fall asleep at night.

Preschoolers (3 to 5 years): Preschoolers average about 11–12 hours at night, plus an afternoon nap. Most give up this nap by 5 years of age.

School-age (5 to 12 years): School-age kids need about 10–11 hours at night. Some 5-year-olds might still need a nap, and if a regular nap isn't possible, they might need an earlier bedtime.

How Can I Tell if My Child Gets Enough Sleep?

Most parents underestimate the amount of sleep kids need. So watch for signs of a lack of sleep, which can range from the obvious — like being tired — to more subtle problems with behavior and schoolwork.

Ask yourself:

  • Does my child act sleepy during the day?
  • Does my child get cranky and irritable in the late afternoon?
  • Is it a battle to get my child out of bed in the morning?
  • Is my child inattentive, impatient, hyperactive, or aggressive?
  • Does my child have trouble focusing on schoolwork and other tasks?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, consider adjusting your child's sleep or nap schedule. It may take several weeks to find a routine that works. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about your child's sleep.

Naptime Routines and Other Concerns

The key to good napping can be as simple as setting up a good nap routine early on and sticking to it. With infants, watch for cues like fussing and rubbing eyes, then put your baby to bed while sleepy but not yet asleep. This teaches kids how to fall asleep themselves — a skill that gets even more important as they get older. Soft music, dim lights, or a quiet story or rhyme at bedtime can help ease the transition to sleep and become a source of comfort for your child.

For toddlers and preschoolers, sticking to a naptime schedule can a challenge. Many do still love their nap, but others don't want to miss a thing and will fight sleep even as their eyes are closing. In this case, don't let naptime become a battle — you can't force your child to sleep, but you can insist on some quiet time. Let your child read books or play quietly in their room. Parents are often surprised by how quickly quiet time can lead to sleep time — but even if it doesn't, at least your child is getting some much-needed rest. If your child has given up daytime naps, consider setting an earlier bedtime.

Many parents worry that naptime will interfere with kids' bedtime, especially on days when a child takes a late-afternoon nap. But before you end naps entirely in an effort to wear out your child by bedtime, consider this: Well-rested kids are quicker to settle down at night than overtired ones. Overtired kids are often "wired" and restless, unable to self-soothe at bedtime, and more likely to wake through the night.

If you feel your child's late naptime is the cause of bedtime problems, try making the nap a little bit earlier, which may mean waking your child a little earlier in the morning so the nap can begin sooner.

You might also try waking kids from a nap earlier than usual so they have a longer active period before bedtime. In other words, try to make some adjustments before abandoning the nap — both you and your child will feel much better if there is one!

Date reviewed: April 2016